College Football Rankings 10-13

It’s an insanely inaccurate science, no question, and no logic pattern can be applied in every situation, so the rankings are unto themselves full of double standards and hypocrisy and thus vulnerable to never ending shredding from anyone who sees them. I’m forgiving of singular bad games, and I weigh what’s happened most recently more heavily, because I’m trying to determine who the best teams right now are. It’s for nothing but banter and fun, and because I’ve been doing it since I was 8 years old.

I’ve also decided doing them, this early in the season, every two weeks is better, to prevent knee jerk reactions. So, here are my complete rankings as of October 13.

*The App State vs UL Lafayette game is not taken into consideration*

1 Alabama 6-0
2 Ohio State 5-0
3 Michigan 6-0
4 Clemson 6-0
5 Washington 6-0
6 Louisville 4-1
7 Wisconsin 4-1
8 Texas A&M 6-0
9 Tennessee 5-1
10 Florida St 4-2
11 Miami 4-1
12 Ole Miss 3-2
13 Auburn 4-2
14 Nebraska 5-0
15 Houston 5-1
16 Baylor 5-0
17 Arkansas 4-2
18 LSU 3-2
19 Oklahoma 3-2
20 Virginia Tech 4-1
21 Florida 4-1
22 Troy 4-1
23 Western Michigan 6-0
24 West Virginia 4-0
25 Boise St 5-0
26 Utah 5-1
27 South Florida 5-1
28 Georgia 4-2
29 Memphis 4-1
30 USC 3-3
31 TCU 4-2
32 North Carolina 4-2
33 Navy 4-1
34 Toledo 4-1
35 Pitt 4-2
36 Penn State 4-2
37 Arizona St 5-1
38 NC St 4-1
39 BYU 3-3
40 Wake Forest 5-1
41 Colorado 4-2
42 Kansas State 3-2
43 Appalachian St 3-2
44 Washington St 3-2
45 Central Michigan 4-2
46 Indiana 3-2
47 Oklahoma St 4-2
48 Texas Tech 3-2
49 Tulsa 4-1
50 Stanford 3-2
51 UCLA 3-3
52 San Diego St 4-1
53 Cal 3-3
54 Iowa 4-2
55 Air Force 4-1
56 Louisiana Tech 3-3
57 Maryland 4-1
58 Minnesota 3-2
59 Northwestern 2-3
60 Duke 3-3
61 Texas 2-3
62 Michigan St 2-3
63 Georgia Tech 3-3
64 Middle Tennessee St 4-1
65 Oregon 2-4
66 Missouri 2-3
67 Arizona 2-4
68 Notre Dame 2-4
69 Southern Miss 4-2
70 Georgia Southern 3-2
71 Oregon St 2-3
72 Wyoming 4-2
73 UConn 3-3
74 South Carolina 2-4
75 UCF 3-2
76 South Alabama 3-2
77 Mississippi St 2-3
78 Kentucky 3-3
79 Akron 4-2
80 Army 3-2
81 Temple 3-3
82 Virginia 2-3
83 Vanderbilt 2-4
84 Cincinnati 3-3
85 Ohio 4-2
86 Colorado St 3-3
87 Western Kentucky 3-3
88 Iowa St 1-5
89 Purdue 3-2
90 Syracuse 2-4
91 Eastern Michigan 4-2
92 Old Dominion 4-2
93 East Carolina 2-4
94 Hawaii 3-3
95 Ball State 3-3
96 UTSA 2-3
97 Utah St 2-4
98 Tulane 3-2
99 Boston College 3-3
100 Nevada 3-3
101 Arkansas St 1-4
102 Illinois 1-4
103 Idaho 3-3
104 SMU 2-4
105 UL Lafayette 2-3
106 Northern Illinois 1-5
107 UNLV 2-4
108 Georgia St 1-4
109 UL Monroe 1-4
110 North Texas 3-3
111 Kent State 2-4
112 New Mexico St 2-3
113 New Mexico 2-3
114 Texas St 2-3
115 Kansas 1-4
116 Fresno St 1-5
117 Rutgers 2-4
118 Marshall 1-4
119 Bowling Green 1-5
120 UMass 1-5
121 Miami Ohio 0-6
122 Charlotte 2-4
123 FIU 2-4
124 Buffalo 1-4
125 UTEP 1-5
126 Florida Atlantic 1-5
127 San Jose St 1-5
128 Rice 0-5

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College Football Rankings 1-128 (9/26)

1 Alabama 4-0
2 Ohio State 3-0
3 Michigan 4-0
4 Clemson 4-0
5 Louisville 4-0
6 Stanford 3-0
7 Texas A&M 4-0
8 Houston 4-0
9 Florida St 3-1
10 Ole Miss 2-2
11 Wisconsin 4-0
12 Oklahoma 1-2
13 Washington 4-0
14 Arkansas 3-1
15 TCU 3-1
16 Baylor 4-0
17 Tennessee 4-0
18 Miami 3-0
19 Nebraska 4-0
20 UCLA 2-2
21 Troy 3-1
22 Auburn 2-2
23 LSU 2-2
24 West Virginia 3-0
25 Florida 3-1
26 Utah 4-0
27 Virginia Tech 3-1
28 Western Michigan 4-0
29 Michigan St 2-1
30 Georgia 3-1
31 Toledo 3-0
32 Arizona St 4-0
33 North Carolina 3-1
34 San Diego St 3-0
35 Cincinnati 3-1
36 Southern Miss 3-1
37 BYU 1-3
38 South Florida 3-1
39 USC 1-3
40 Kansas State 2-1
41 Colorado 3-1
42 Cal 2-2
43 Texas 2-1
44 Boise St 3-0
45 Oregon 2-2
46 Memphis 3-0
47 Iowa 3-1
48 Oklahoma St 2-2
49 Appalachian St 2-2
50 Pitt 2-2
51 Arizona 2-2
52 Texas Tech 2-1
53 Georgia Southern 3-1
54 Wake Forest 4-0
55 Penn State 2-2
56 Missouri 2-2
57 Minnesota 3-0
58 Navy 3-0
59 Georgia Tech 3-1
60 Washington St 1-2
61 Central Michigan 3-1
62 Indiana 2-1
63 Syracuse 2-2
64 Mississippi St 2-2
65 Kentucky 2-2
66 Oregon St 1-2
67 Tulsa 3-1
68 South Carolina 2-2
69 East Carolina 2-2
70 NC St 2-1
71 UConn 2-2
72 Vanderbilt 2-2
73 Akron 2-2
74 Western Kentucky 2-2
75 Maryland 3-0
76 Purdue 2-1
77 Northwestern 1-3
78 UCF 2-2
79 Duke 2-2
80 Notre Dame 1-3
81 Ball State 3-1
82 Army 3-1
83 Virginia 1-3
84 Air Force 3-0
85 Boston College 2-2
86 Middle Tennessee St 3-1
87 Marshall 1-2
88 Nevada 2-2
89 Louisiana Tech 1-3
90 Temple 2-2
91 Colorado St 2-2
92 Miami Ohio 0-4
93 Utah St 2-2
94 Tulane 2-2
95 UL Lafayette 2-2
96 South Alabama 2-2
97 Illinois 1-2
98 SMU 2-2
99 Fresno St 1-3
100 UTSA 1-3
101 Old Dominion 2-2
102 Florida Atlantic 1-3
103 Texas St 1-2
104 Ohio 2-2
105 Eastern Michigan 3-1
106 Arkansas St 0-4
107 Georgia St 0-3
108 Rutgers 2-2
109 UMass 1-3
110 Wyoming 2-2
111 Buffalo 1-2
112 Northern Illinois 0-4
113 UTEP 1-3
114 UL Monroe 1-2
115 Hawaii 1-3
116 New Mexico St 1-3
117 Iowa St 1-3
118 Idaho 2-2
119 New Mexico 1-2
120 North Texas 2-2
121 UNLV 1-3
122 Kansas 1-2
123 Bowling Green 1-3
124 Kent State 1-3
125 Rice 0-4
126 San Jose St 1-3
127 Charlotte 1-3
128 FIU 0-4

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Suicide, the Elephant in the Room

Seeing as it’s National Suicide Prevention week, and it’s still something that doesn’t garner enough conversation, I’d be remiss not point out a few things I’ve come to understand when it comes to suicide, and the contemplation of it, as well as dealing with those in such a situation. Now, if you’ve ever read anything I write, you know I can get a bit long winded, so, you’ve been warned.
1) Don’t be the, “they’re only doing it for attention” person. A) Taking that route might result in the biggest regret you ever have in life. And B) Because OF COURSE THEY’RE DOING IT FOR ATTENTION. They know something isn’t right, they’re absolutely crying out for attention because they know they need help, somewhere, with something, and they don’t know how to do it themselves. Don’t be that callous asshole who just says they’re only looking for attention and turns the other way.
2) When someone is contemplating suicide, or makes mention of possibly considering it, or no longer sees it as the worst option, do NOT go about telling them how selfish they are for that, and how big of a jerk they are, or what a coward they are for feeling that way. That will only reinforce the feelings they already have. Do you think they WANT to feel the way they do? Do you REALLY think it’s something they choose to feel? So don’t go prove them right about themselves by saying things like that. Focus on positive reinforcement, don’t hammer home the negatives.
3) Just remember, in just about every case of suicidal thoughts and attempts, the thought process includes honestly believing those they care about will be better off. In the mind of the person contemplating suicide, they’re doing something selfless. Is that fucked up? Of course it is. But hey, that’s what being depressed is, it’s being fucked up. And that kind of fuckedupdedness needs attention and needs help. So if you unfortunately are a survivor of someone who did commit suicide, know that when they did what they did, they were doing what they felt, in that moment, was the best thing they could do for those they loved and cared about. Thinking of them as selfish is wrong. Is it a selfish act? In black and white terms, yes, sure it is. But this isn’t a black and white issue. What a healthy mind sees as normal, or sees as selfish, or sees as any number of things, differs greatly from what the mind of someone suffering from depression sees. Be cognizant of that. The way someone suffering from depression rationalizes something versus the way someone who doesn’t is night and day.
4) Not everyone is going to say something when they feel these feelings and venture into the darkest of dark places. Some people will keep it to themselves and then all of a sudden out of nowhere they take their life. Except, it’s not out of nowhere. The signs are there. Pay attention to those you care about. When you notice significant changes in behavior, a propensity to listen to and watch sad things ALL the time, a cutting out of things they used to do for enjoyment, appetite changes, solidarity, etc…. don’t hesitate to speak up. Just talk to them. Engage them. But do so positively. Don’t tell them they’re being a debbie downer, or a loner, or simply that they need to stop drinking so much. This will only serve as that negative reinforcement. But be mindful of those you love and care about. Pay attention to the subtle things, because sometimes they’re really not so subtle.
5) This one I can’t stress enough. NEVER tell someone who is depressed to simply “get over it”. For someone who struggles with depression, yes, something as trivial to you as losing a book they had since they were a child, or even a sporting event, can trigger a trip down a dark place. There’s a difference in legit depression and being disappointed over something, but for those who are susceptible to depression, it doesn’t take much. And it also makes it easy to magnify the most trivial of things. If it happens to be something “bigger”, like losing a pet, the end of a relationship, losing a job, going to jail, etc…. “Just get over it”, or simply, “It will get better” isn’t going to work. Telling someone struggling with depression that only causes them to (again, their way of rationalizing things is different than someone not struggling with depression) fall further into their oblivion as they wonder and get angry over the fact that they can’t have that outlook. They would love to feel that confidence. But they don’t. And it creates an even more desolate and dire outlook.
Depression isn’t something you “get over”. It’s not something you ever have complete control of, even when you seemingly have control of it. It’s always there, lurking, waiting, and ready to pounce. It’s something you must always be mindful of, and always be wary of things that might trigger trips to dark places.
Michelob used to run an ad campaign that had the slogan, “Some days are better than others”. This couldn’t be more true for anyone struggling with depression, even those who have a very good handle on it. Some days just suck, and you don’t know why, you don’t have any explanation for it, but they just do. If you know someone who fights depression, understand this about them. Don’t give them shit for being in a “mood” that day.
Some days the sun is bright and the world is a wonderful place. Others, it takes everything inside that outwardly smiling and bubbling person to keep themselves from just hitting the eject button. And there may not have been anything in particular that even caused it, no specific event or trigger. It’s just another day in the life of fighting something that you never completely defeat.
Suicide is still a giant elephant in the room. It’s an uncomfortable topic for many. And I’m willing to bet part of why it’s so uncomfortable is because discussing it forces to people to look at themselves, and that can be scary.
Those who have survived suicide attempts, or those who fight depression on a daily basis can help shed light to prevent others from making the mistakes that they made. But they need to feel as though it’s something they can openly talk about without judgement from others, without being looked down upon, or treated as though they’re beneath others and some kind of weird emo freak.
For years I created a wonderfully entertaining story as to how I got my scars and why I have no stomach or esophagus. And then as I got to know you, and trust you, I would tell the truth.
Not anymore. You ask, I tell. Or, like in the case of a first date, I tell you I will tell you later. But I don’t fabricate an explanation anymore. I don’t take shame in it. I’ve learned so much from it, and know of multiple times my experience has both helped someone contemplating it, and also been of great comfort to those who have lost someone to suicide. It’s a part of who I am. It’s a battle I fight every day. But I don’t need to pretend I got drunk at a pool party and chugged the wrong bottle in the pool shed. I’m also fortunate that I surround myself with good people who surround themselves with good people, so there’s less fear of judgement and scorn.
There are many conversations we need to keep going in society, but this is one extremely important to me, because it’s an issue that in some way impacts so many more people than we as a society are willing to acknowledge.

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Summer Slumps Don’t Matter to Jimmie Johnson

Much has been made of the demise of Hendrick Motorsports and the slump they’re enduring and how the sky is falling over at NASCAR’s preeminent shop. Yawn. We’ve heard this before. In fact, for the most dominant team in NASCAR’s modern era, the sky falls practically every summer. And just like clockwork as the leaves change, amazingly so does Johnson’s fortune as the summer winds to a close.

When something happens often enough, it’s no longer due to chance, or luck. You just chalk it up to the way things are. And Jimmie Johnson struggling through the summer, seemingly making him seem vulnerable, only to recover once the playoffs start is a fall tradition that’s about as entrenched as Thanksgiving Day football at this point.

So let’s slow down wondering what’s wrong with Hendrick Motorsports. Talk to me after the chase if Chad Knaus and Jimmie Johnson don’t have their Lowe’s Chevy up front consistently over the final ten races of the season competing for wins and the title.

After all, we’ve seen this before. Just look


Summer- From Indianapolis up until the final race of the regular season finished 36th or worse in 4 of six races. Three weeks in a row suffered a blown engine while averaging a 28.2 finish over the final six races of the regular season.

Chase- Slump continued to begin the chase by opening with an 11th and 10th, followed by two DNFs at Talladega and Kansas to seemingly end championship hopes. Proceeded to win four of the next five races and then finished 2nd at Homestead to narrowly miss out on winning the championship.


Summer- After the series 14th race at Pocono Johnson held a 123 point lead over Greg Biffle in the standings. Johnson would go on to finish out of the top ten in eight of the next dozen races with an average finish of 19.4 and fell 316 points behind Tony Stewart.

Chase- Johnson won twice in the chase and entered Homestead just 52 points behind Tony Stewart in the race for the championship before an accident relegated him to a 40th place finish.


Summer- Over the final five races of the regular season Johnson had an average finish of 14.8 with only one top ten finish.

Chase- After being wrecked by teammate Brian Vickers on the last lap while racing for the win at Talladega, Johnson found himself 8th in points after four races in the chase and 202 points out of the lead. Over the next five races his average finish was 1.8, with four runner-ups and a win en route to his first championship.


Summer- From Dover during the first weekend of June thru the Brickyard 400 at the end of July, Johnson finished 15th or worse in six of the next eight races. Three of those finishes were 37th or worse and he found himself 9th in points, 607 in arrears of teammate Jeff Gordon after averaging a 23rd place finish during that stretch.

Chase- Johnson averaged a steady 7.8 average finish over the first five chase races. He then proceeded to win four races in a row to catapult him to his second straight title.


Summer- For once, there was no summer slump to speak of. Struggles during May kept Johnson from commanding the standings, but he ended the regular season 3rd in points.

Chase- Eight finishes in the top 10, and no finishes worse than 15th coupled nicely with three victories as Johnson matched Cale Yarborough with his third straight championship.


Summer- After twenty races and his victory at Indianapolis, Johnson sat second in points. However, over the final six races of the regular season, Johnson would only finish in the top ten once, managing only to have an average finish of 18.8.

Chase- Four wins and seven top five finishes were more than enough for Johnson to wrap up title number four.


Summer- Back to back wins at Sonoma and Loudon had Johnson second in points, 105 behind Kevin Harvick after 17 races. His average finish over the next seven races though was a staggering 23.3 with just one top ten finish and five finishes out of the top twenty.

Chase- After a 25th place finish in the first race of the chase, Johnson used nine straight finishes inside the top ten to wrap up his fifth consecutive championship.


Summer- There was no real slump for the 48 team over the summer of 2011, and many expected them to be a favorite for the title once the chase began.

Chase- An absolute disaster for Johnson, they finished out of the top ten in seven of the ten races and finished a then career worst 6th in points.


Summer- There was a mini slump from Daytona thru Richmond as Johnson had five finishes out of the top ten over the final nine events of the regular season.

Chase- Five top five finishes among the first eight events of the chase had Johnson in the points lead with two laps to go, but an uncharacteristic collapse over the final two races saw finishes of 32nd and 36th derail their championship hopes.


Summer- Over the final four races leading into the chase, Johnson had an average finish of 36th, and average finish of 27.5 over the final half dozen races in the regular season.

Chase- For the second time in his career, Johnson used nine top tens in the chase to walk away with the championship at the end of the year.


Summer- After 17 races Johnson sat second in points, right on the heels of Jeff Gordon. But after averaging a 33rd place over their next five races, including three finishes of 39th or worse, Johnson had fallen to 7th in points.

Chase- Johnson steadily advanced out of the first round of NASCAR’s reformulated chase, but he failed to finish higher than 17th in any of the races in round two and was eliminated.


Summer- After the season’s official halfway point Johnson found himself second in points. But from there to the conclusion of the regular season eight races later, Johnson only averaged a 14.4 average finish.

Chase- This time they couldn’t right the ship at all in the chase, as mechanical failure at Dover doomed them to first round elimination.

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Re-Evaluating Chances of Chase Contenders


Buescher’s victory at Pocono may have completely changed the game in the quest for the 2016 chase.

Two weeks ago I looked at the drivers not yet locked into the chase field with a victory and gave my appraisal of their chances at the time to manage to make NASCAR’s sixteen team playoff field. The world of NASCAR is a strange place, because a lot has changed in those two weeks.

Dale Earnhardt Jr seems no closer to coming back from concussion related symptoms, so the chances of him pointing his way have disappeared. Chase Elliott’s tumble has continued to where it’s bordering on epic collapse, and Jamie McMurray’s bad decision at Indianapolis has left him vulnerable.

Oh yeah, then there’s Chris Buescher raining on everyone’s parade at Pocono and throwing a very unforeseen monkey wrench into things. Though, if you recall, two weeks ago I mentioned the possibility of a well timed rainstorm getting someone buried deep in the standings an upset victory and an invitation to the party.

While Buescher still has some work to do to get in the top 30, for the sake of prognostication purpose, we’ll assume he gets there, so more on him in a moment. Obviously, if Buescher does not make the top 30, then that changes things a great deal, but for his sake, I hope he does, and for the sake of discussion, we’ll assume so.

Austin Dillon +41 (65% two weeks ago at +41)

Dillon had a car that seemed capable of winning on Monday at Pocono and teammate Paul Menard was fast all weekend. That’s got to give the entire Richard Childress team some confidence. What also has to give them confidence is that Dillon is in the exact same place he was two weeks ago, and there now even fewer races in which to see his lead evaporate. Of some concern to Dillon might be that they finished 20th or worse at Sonoma, Bristol, and Richmond earlier this year, and a repeat of that performance would leave the team little room for error at Darlington and Michigan. At this point, it would probably take two bad races or another surprise winner to keep Dillon out of the chase, but as we’ve seen, anything is possible. The upcoming schedule is the only thing keeping Dillon from really being a slam dunk at this point.


Ryan Newman +29 (50% two weeks ago at +50)

While the speed at RCR is promising for Newman, an average finish of 21.5 over the last two races is not. Newman should be in position to be on cruise control into the chase, but instead he’s left to sweat it out. It’s a bit difficult to put too much stock into his performance at Richmond because RCR as a whole is better, but it’s notable how much the entire team struggled at the track that will wrap up the regular season. If Newman gets to Richmond needing to fight his way in, you have to wonder how confident they’ll be. Then again, if you “need” to accomplish something like that, there are definitely worse drivers than Ryan Newman to have wheeling the racecar.


Chase Elliott +25 (85% two weeks ago at +52)

Speaking of going the wrong direction… Elliott suddenly finds himself in real trouble, especially if someone outside of the top 16 wins a race in the next month *cough A.J. Allmendinger cough*. The problem isn’t the speed of the racecar, aside from Indy and Sonoma. The problem is finishing races. It seems pretty simple, based on the speed that’s been in the 24, just stay out of trouble and you’ll be fine. Elliott made a serious rookie mistake Monday that cost him big time. Instead of being 50 points to the good fresh of a top ten run getting some momentum back, the team heads to a road course with zero margin for error the rest of the way. Another bad finish and Elliott is likely to find himself on the outside looking in. And that’s regardless of whether someone behind him in points snares a victory. With a road course, Bristol, Darlington looming, finishing these next five races in one piece and on the lead lap is a daunting enough task. Putting together enough good finishes to hang on to his spot in the chase might be a bit much. If no more than one driver on the outside looking in steals a victory, Elliott would have like his chances if he can string together four top 15 finishes and a top 20. If he can post some top eight finishes like he was doing the first half of the year, he could be in a much more comfortable position when they arrive to Richmond. The pressure is on right now, and so far Elliott and the team aren’t handling it well. A bad weekend at Watkins Glen and the wheels might fall off.



Monday’s rookie mistake has Chase Elliott in the danger zone and his chase hopes getting closer to being on life support

Jamie McMurray +9 (55% two weeks ago at +27)

An average finish of 19.5 over the last two weeks compared to a 5.5 for his teammate Kyle Larson, and Jamie McMurray suddenly finds himself in major trouble as the regular season winds down. While Larson has five top ten finishes and three top fives in his last ten races, McMurray only has three non plate top ten finishes, and zero top fives at a non plate track all season. While consistency and staying out of trouble have him in contention for a chase birth, the inability to run up front and post strong finishes may very well keep him out. McMurray’s saving grace may wind up being the free falling Elliott who, despite out running McMurray on a weekly basis, has fallen back into McMurray’s clutches by not doing the one thing McMurray manages to do as well as anyone, finish the race. I don’t expect McMurray to hold off his teammate, and if Allmendinger wins this week, or someone else nabs an upset later on, I don’t think McMurray possesses the speed to race his way back in. His hope will be that Chase Elliott continues to struggle.


Kyle Larson -9 (43% two weeks ago at -25)

Even facing a pretty sizable gap two weeks ago, I liked the chances for Larson based on the speed shown in his Target Chevy. Larson certainly has done anything to make me reconsider that confidence. While he’s currently on the outside looking in, and doesn’t need to see Allmendinger get a victory this weekend, few competing for a spot have to feel as confident as Larson and his team does right now. Not only that, Darlington and Bristol are both tracks that he himself could snatch a victory and lock himself into the chase by means of a win. On the flip side, because he’s doing the chasing, he can ill-afford a bad race, certainly in the next couple because he needs to keep the pressure on McMurray and Elliott. So the question will be, how hard does he push it to win a race, and where is the line where he takes what he can get and settles for the points?


Kasey Kahne -29 (32% two weeks ago at -22)

On the positive side, Kahne opens this five race stretch at a road course, where he finished 9th at in Sonoma earlier this year, and he closes it out at Richmond, a place he’s won before and posted his best finish of the year at with a 4th place earlier this season. On a less positive note, Kahne is 29 points out, and stands 45 points behind Elliott, meaning a winner coming out of the top 16 could effectively doom his chances. Kahne has pulled his own rabbit out of a hat before, winning at Atlanta in 2014 in what was a must win situation, so if the situation calls for it, and Kahne is in contention, he’s shown he has what it takes to go and get it. The question will be if this team can find the speed to put him that situation. Nothing would seem to suggest that they can, and with the team sharing a shop with them struggling in their own right to salvage their chase spot, there may not be much teamwork between the two going forward. Kahne doesn’t have the speed to just catch McMurray, and McMurray doesn’t finish poorly enough for Kasey to feel confident he’ll fall back to him. And even if he did, there’s still the matter of Kyle Larson to deal with.


Ryan Blaney -37 (40% two weeks ago at -16)

Perhaps no one has suffered as much in the past two weeks as Blaney. At Indianapolis Blaney was looking at a possible top ten finish, and certainly a top fifteen, before being taken out in a wreck that wasn’t his doing and relegated to a crushing 36th place finish. While they rebounded Monday with a solid 11th place, that’s not going to be good enough, and they know it. Based on McMurray’s average finish, Blaney is in a difficult spot of basically needing to finish inside the top ten in each of the next five races to be able to chase McMurray down, and that’s not even considering that he also finds himself 28 points behind Larson. In other words, Blaney needs the Ganassi cars to suffer problems over the next five races, and he can’t afford any himself. Or, he can go win a race, which isn’t out of the question. Blaney was very strong at Bristol in the spring and the Wood Brothers have a knack for that track. They might be circling that one as their hail mary shot to make the chase.


Trevor Bayne -37 (20% two weeks ago at -14)

Let’s face it, Bayne was fortunate to be as close as he was at that point. Nobody that’s listed as contender runs worse than Bayne on a week to week basis and Bayne’s only real shot was for there to be no more surprise winners, and for those in front of him to continue to have trouble. There is nothing in the way this team has run anywhere besides the restrictor plates to make you think they’re going to suddenly start running in the top ten, much less contending for victories. While a lot can still happen over the next five races to those they’re chasing, let’s be real here, Bayne doesn’t run well enough to really even take advantage of that. Progress has been made at Roush, but not enough has been made with the 6 team.


Ricky Stenhouse -45 (3% two weeks ago at -41)

Stenhouse is further back with fewer races to go than he was two weeks ago. In other words, his chances were slim, and slim has headed for the door. Bristol is a track that’s been good to him in his career, and depending on what happens at the half mile, a top five run while misfortune striking those in front of him could at least put him in the mix over the final three races of the regular season. Or something really wild could happen and he could win at Thunder Valley. For Stenhouse, they need to get through Watkins Glen without losing any more points, and hope they can make some serious ground at Bristol. If not, their playoff dreams will be vanquished.


From here down, getting in on points isn’t happening. Earnhardt is 56 points out and won’t race this week, so he’ll be even further behind, and let’s face it, at this point, a 56 point deficit with this many drivers to leap frog as well is too much to ask for. So it’s all about getting a win.

Dale Earnhardt Jr’s immediate future is cloudy, and really, perhaps his long term future is. The priority is getting Junior healthy, and this season may be one they’ve already decided to put on the shelf to get ready for 2017. If Junior does come back, Richmond is a place he’s been victorious before. And you know NASCAR loves a good story. He also has stopped long losing streaks at Michigan before as well, so if he waits until after Bristol to return, those are two tracks where a victory is still a possibility.


A.J. Allmendinger circles two races each year and those are his chances to make the chase, and he knows it. He missed at Sonoma and now comes to Watkins Glen with one last swing at things. The unfortunate thing is that Allmendinger has run well enough and with enough speed that he should be in contention to get in on points. But it’s been a year from hell in terms of the luck and misfortune for Allmendinger and its lead to immense frustration at the racetrack. Nothing would erase all of that like a win this week at Watkins Glen. Not only would it propel Allmendinger into the chase, it would create a bigger mess and more pressure for a slew of others.


Greg Biffle and his Roush car have been showing more and more speed each week. Enough to win? Doubtful. But don’t count him out at Darlington, a track he experienced great success at back in the mid 2000s, or at Michigan, where fuel mileage and strategy could certainly factor in. Is it likely? Of course not. But hey, neither was Chris Buescher winning.


Others. Okay, I put this at like 0.5% two weeks ago, and low behold an “other” won. So maybe I’ll bump it up this time around. The great thing about NASCAR is that truly, anything can happen.


As for Chris Buescher, he’s still six points out of the top 30, and it would be an awful shame to win a race and miss the chase because of that. Six points is barely over one position a race, something that can be done if he simply stays out of trouble. Also assisting him is the fact that he is able to concentrate on two tasks each race, beating Regan Smith and David Ragan, as no two other cars out there matter for this team until they get thru Richmond. Is he a slam dunk to do it? No, and if he doesn’t, it obviously greatly increases the chances for guys like Kahne or Blaney to get back into the chase.



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Handicapping the Race to the Chase


The 2016 race to the chase will be altered greatly depending on when Dale Earnhardt Jr. returns to the track.

So it’s time to get down to it for the Sprint Cup Series in the race for the Chase. With only seven races remaining, we’ve essentially reached the stretch run and the wildcard race is on. And thanks to some massive storylines regarding the Hendrick Motorsports cars of Chase Elliott and Dale Earnhardt Jr, the race for the Chase has some perhaps unexpected spice.

Elliott’s tumble in the standings thanks to four bad finishes in a row (though three of them were not of his making) and Earnhardt’s absence from at least one, and possibly more, races has injected some drama into the chase run and welcomed some new players to the party that otherwise might not be there.

As of New Hampshire, and the 19th race run, there are 11 drivers who have scored victories, leaving five spots up for grabs. Obviously, the easiest way to wrap up one of those spots will be to win a race, but here we are over halfway through the season and to this point only Elliott, Earnhardt and Larson have shown to have the ability to pull that off.

But that’s the thing with Sprint Cup racing, you never know who might steal one. So while I’m going to focus on those who can still have at least a puncher’s chance of pointing their way in, drivers like Paul Menard, Danica Patrick or Aric Almirola could still steal a victory through fuel mileage or perhaps even a well timed rainstorm. So they aren’t completely out of the picture, but let’s face it, the odds are very much against them.

So as we head to the final six races of Indianapolis, Pocono, Watkins Glen, Bristol, Michigan, Darlington and Richmond, how do we handicap the race for these final five spots? Which of these contenders is most likely to get a victory and put the points talk to bed, which will need to rely on points, and who can spoil the party with a victory somewhere and leap frog the competition?

Chase Elliott +52 – Elliott looked like a lock a month ago, but despite having top ten runs going at Daytona, Kentucky, and Loudon, Elliott hasn’t finished better than 31st over the past three races.


This accident between rookies Ryan Blaney and Chase Elliott at Kentucky while the two were both in the top ten had major chase implications.

The good news is he still is over a full race and then some to the good, and they return to Pocono and Michigan where Elliott led laps and contended for a win, as well as Bristol, another place he contended for a victory. The bad news is that should someone off the chase grid win, theoretically that lead would dwindle about a third of the way down. However, the Dale Earnhardt Jr. situation could very well offset that somewhat. Additional bad news comes in the fact that Richmond and Sears Point were two of the most uncompetitive races Elliott has run in the first half, and with a return trip to Richmond being the finale before the chase and another road course looming, there’s cause for concern. While historically drivers who run well at Michigan and especially Pocono typically do well at Indy, Elliott’s Xfinity Series history suggests it’s not a track he’s incredibly comfortable with. Throw in Darlington which is, well, despite his victory in his first Xfinity Series start back in 2014, no small task for rookies, and the potential landmines are everywhere. Elliott’s bad luck at some point you think will end and the team will get back to finishing where they run. But with potential pitfalls ahead, they’ve lost their margin for error and must capitalize on the tracks that are their strengths. Should they run into misfortune at Pocono, Bristol, or Michigan, the pressure will really mount at Darlington and Richmond. The best thing Elliott can do is get the pressure off with a win over the next month, which of all the drivers without a win, he’s the one most likely to score one.

Chances of making the chase- 85%

Ryan Newman +50 – While Chase Elliott has led laps and contended for wins, he’s only two points ahead of Ryan Newman for highest in points without a win. And the reason for that is Newman only has one finish outside of the top 30, while Elliott has five. Newman is doing what Newman always does. He rides around in mediocre equipment, running mid pack, and then survives the carnage of late race restarts (or causes some) to wind up finishing around the top 15. Over the last 15 races Newman only has one finish of worse than 18th and has 10 finishes inside the top 15. It’s a formula that has worked for Newman in the past, and is on track to work this year. While there is little reason to think Newman is going to win a race (just a single lap led and one top five finish to date), there’s arguably even less to think he’s not going to make the chase. The key at this point as much as anything is avoid really bad finishes, and that’s the M.O. of this Luke Lambert led 31 team.

Chances of making the chase- 90%

Austin Dillon +41 – Newman’s teammate at Richard Childress Racing is in a slightly less comfortable boat than Newman, as Dillon, while comfortably in as of now, is one bad race away from fighting for his chase life, or, he’s one win away from a guy like A.J. Allmendinger (more on that later) from having to sweat it all the way to Richmond to secure his place in NASCAR’s chase. Dillon has been less consistent than Newman, posting more strong runs where he looked like a potential contender while also having a few more finishes out of the top 20. At times, especially early in the year, it looked like Dillon was knocking on the door of getting that first win and securing his spot in the chase. However, he hasn’t qualified better than 8th at a non plate track since his pole at California and he has only led four laps all season. It’s difficult to look at that and think he’s going to have a shot to win a race in the next seven, which can make for some high pressure, especially if they have a bad race in the next couple of weeks. Dillon, like Elliott, struggled at Sears Point, so you have to wonder if they’re already peeking ahead at Watkins Glen with a little bit of dread. On the other hand, they do go to Michigan, and at California and Michigan earlier this year they’ve shown some decent speed. They might need to circle their trip to the Irish Hills as one to try to create a buffer before the back to back night races to end the regular season. Dillon only has four top ten finishes in his last dozen starts, and two of those came on the plate tracks. Dillon may wind up one driver who benefits greatly from Earnhardt’s misfortune as Dillon may need that buffer in case a guy like Allmendinger or Kyle Larson grab a win over the next two months.

Chances of making the chase – 65%

Jamie McMurray +27 – Jamie McMurray’s average finish the last three years has been 16.5, 16.2 and 14.9. Thus far in 2016 it’s 16.1. In other words, Jamie McMurray is being Jamie McMurray. He hasn’t led a lap all year and the only top five finish he has came at Talladega. The speed to contend for wins simply hasn’t been there, which is par for the course. But McMurray is a heady veteran who gets his equipment home and finds a way to salvage something decent most race weekends. A couple of positive things pointing his direction are the fact that the team seems to be trending upwards as of late with three top five finishes in the last five races, and one of those that was not was at Daytona where he was involved in an accident while contending for a solid finish, and maybe more. This couldn’t come at a better time as McMurray will return to Indianapolis where he has been victorious before. With Earnhardt likely to sit out at Indy, McMurray looks at the situation like his lead is 29 points over Ryan Blaney, with Kasey Kahne and Kyle Larson, along with Earnhardt, still nipping at his heels. McMurray is in a good spot, and if he just soldiers along the next seven races, he should make the chase. However, seven straight races without a bad finish under the spotlight and pressure of racing for the chase is a tall order, even for the most accomplished of teams. McMurray’s nightmare would be for Allmendinger to win at Watkins Glen and then someone like Earnhardt, Larson or Kahne to win one of the other six races. Would McMurray be able to chase down the RCR duo and rookie phenom ahead of him? Have they shown the speed to be able to make up points? I’m not so sure. And even if they avoid trouble, they are just a couple of top five runs from Larson or Kahne away from having those two breathing down McMurray’s neck coming down the stretch. It’s going to be serious nail biting time for the Missouri native as we head towards Richmond, and much of his chase future may depend more on what those around him are or are not able to get done over the next two months.

Chances of making the chase – 55%

Dale Earnhardt Jr +14 – There is no murkier chase future than that of the sport’s most popular driver, and perhaps some clarity will come this week when we find out for sure if he’s going to miss Indianapolis, and also perhaps how much more time he will be out of the 88 car, if any. If Earnhardt is a go for Indianapolis, then you probably have to feel good about their chances. While they have been anything but a picture of consistency, one can point to the plate tracks as the reason they are in chase peril in the first place. Three races where top fives were expected and instead Earnhardt only accumulated 27 points, opposed to the 138 he gained in those three events last year. That’s a massive difference, such a difference that were he to have even gained 100 points in plate races this year, Earnhardt would be sitting 8th in points and firmly entrenched in the field of 16. As it is, he may have to sweat it out. The good news is that Pocono and Bristol are left in the regular season and Earnhardt finished 2nd at each earlier this season. Finishes like that can make up a lot of points in a hurry against the group of drivers he’s competing for a chase spot with. So even if he does not race at Indy, which I don’t believe he will, if he’s able to get back in the car at Pocono, you still have to feel pretty good about his chances. He has shown the speed on more than a couple of occasions, especially early in the year, to be considered a contender to win, though aside from Pocono, he really hasn’t shown much of it since early spring. Until we know what his status is going forward, it’s very difficult to handicap his chances. For the sake of argument we will assume he’s back after Indianapolis, because if he isn’t and misses two races, including a Pocono track that might be his best chance for a win and massive points accumulation, then that will probably be all she wrote.

Chances of making the chase (if he only misses one more race) – 40%

Trevor Bayne -14 – Trevor Bayne hasn’t finished worse than 28th all season, and only twice has he finished worse than 25th. Should Bayne finish 25th this weekend and Earnhardt not compete, Bayne would surpass Earnhardt in the standings and into the chase grid, depending of course on what those immediately behind him do this weekend. This is where things get interesting. The gap between Bayne and A.J. Allmendinger (with Ryan Blaney, Kasey Kahne, Kyle Larson and Ricky Stenhouse all in between) is only 29 points, which is barely above four positions a race. More importantly though, for a collection of drivers with average finishes in the 15-18 range, any one finish in the top five can make up a large chunk of ground in a hurry, meaning if one of these teams can just hit the right combination once, especially twice, over the next seven races, it could be the difference in being a chase participant, and being a chase observer. For Bayne, he has to be looking towards Bristol to try to create some separation, where he finished 5th in the spring after qualifying 10th. The problem for a guy like Bayne, or any of these is that if another member of this group wins a race and locks themself in, or worse, two of them do so, do they have enough speed and ability to string together enough top five type runs to make up the ground they trail McMurray and Dillon by? It doesn’t seem particularly likely, so much of their chase hopes rest on either being the one to steal a win, or having no one in this group accomplish the feat. While 2016 has been a vast improvement for Roush, one has to wonder about the pressure of the chase race, something Bayne and his team have not dealt with in the past, and how that will impact them coming down the stretch. The good news is inexperience in this situation is high among a couple of their competitors. But you have to think there might be a big edge for Kasey Kahne in this regard, and a slight one for Allmendinger and Larson as well. It’s major strides for the program and Bayne that they are even in this conversation. Are they going to be able to nail down a playoff spot? My gut says likely not, but, if they keep riding around staying out of trouble knocking off top 25s, they won’t eliminate themselves, and will leave themselves a chance heading to Darlington and Richmond.

Chances of making the chase – 20%

Ryan Blaney -16 – No one on this list besides Chase Elliott has shown the consistent speed that Ryan Blaney is, and that makes him a really interesting wildcard in all of this. As of today, he would miss the chase. But if the Brickyard 400 starts and Dale Earnhardt isn’t in it, Blaney essentially finds himself two points out of the final chase spot, and with the speed to threaten to catch guys like McMurray and Dillon. The key for Blaney will be to quit making the costly mistakes this team and driver have made that have resulted in finishes that don’t represent the way they team ran. Blaney’s recovery for an 11th place last week might be looked at as a season saver if this team goes on to make the chase. Despite as well as they have run, and the speed in the car, they’ve only finished better than 10th on four occasions this year, but the potential is there, and everyone knows it. Bristol in particular was an example of bad fortune as getting caught in the wrong restart line relegated him to a finish outside of the top ten, despite a car that some thought might have a shot to win. With finishes outside of the top 15 in over half the races run thus far this year, the 21 team knows it needs to tighten up over the next seven races. Having not run a full season in years, even being basically a Penske organization now, you wonder if that inexperience might have been a bit of the culprit in their inconsistencies and you wonder if it will rear its ugly head over the next two months. What we do know is the Penske cars have speed, and Blaney has had it too, even if on pit road a bit too often. If Earnhardt can’t go on Sunday, Blaney finds himself in a good spot. If he can finish the deal a couple of times down the stretch and knock out three or four top tens with a couple of top fives, he should be able to join fellow rookie Chase Elliott in the chase, and should be able to get in even if a couple of the guys behind him grab a win. If he can’t, and execution continues to be a problem, then he’s going to have to hope nobody pulls an upset and steals a victory, and he might need a little help from his competitors struggling to get in the field of 16.

Chances of making the chase – 40%

Kasey Kahne -22 – No one, besides possibly Chase Elliott following the giant cushion he once had, has near the pressure on them that Kasey Kahne does as we enter the stretch run. Kahne was in position for a solid points day at Loudon until Ryan Newman’s impatience turned a top 12 finish into a 25th place. That finish is the difference in being knocking on the door and the next in line after Earnhardt, to being on the outside looking in. Also hurting Kahne is a 15 point penalty assessed for failed post race inspection. It will be interesting to see how he feels about this should Matt Kenseth suffer no consequences for failing after winning this past weekend. Granted, Kahne is only 8 points behind Trevor Bayne, and 22 behind Earnhardt. So if he can finish 17th or better at Indianapolis, he should at least jump ahead of Earnhardt. Kahne has been awfully similar to Bayne in that, aside from a couple of plate finishes, he’s avoid finishes in the 30s. The problem is, he’s also avoided finishes in the top half dozen as well. With just eight top five showings over the past 92 races, speculation over Kahne’s future with Hendrick Motorsports has gone from whispers to conversation, and missing the chase would put the driver in a very precarious situation going into 2017, which would be a contract year, should he even make it that far. Kahne needs to figure it out, and fast. Fortunately for him, he’s won at four of the seven tracks left in the regular season, and has a road course victory to his credit. Indianapolis has been a place that Kahne has run well at in the past, and his team needs a boost and some momentum. If they can run like many think they still are capable of this Sunday, they can firmly reinsert themselves into the race for a chase spot. The problem is that success Kahne should be able to fall back on seems so long ago. There are two things they have going in their favor that give them a definitive advantage over their direct competition. One, they’re still a Hendrick Motorsports team, and two, they have a huge edge in experience. In 2014 Kahne went to Atlanta in a must win situation and delivered a clutch win to advance into the chase. It may take something like that again this time around, and despite their struggles, there is too much talent and potential with this team to dismiss it as not possible.

Chances of making the chase – 32%

Kyle Larson -25 – Larson is another very interesting wildcard, and difficult to gauge, while also being one who benefits greatly from Earnhardt’s absence. On one hand, outside of Elliott and Earnhardt, he’s the only one to legitimately contend for a victory this season, and if you take away the points penalty incurred to failing post race inspection earlier this year, he’d be within 10 points of Earnhardt, regardless of whether he missed another race or not. But on the other, Larson’s seven finishes off the lead lap are the most of any viable contender for the chase. Larson hasn’t finished worse than 19th over the last eight races, and that has been what’s enabled him to creep back into the points picture and still have a chance to advance without a win. The upcoming schedule also would seem to favor Larson. While he didn’t finish well at Bristol, he had a very fast racecar and spoke gleefully about returning in August and has shown to be fast on concrete. He’s finished in the top ten in each of his two starts at both Indianapolis and Darlington, and was third behind Elliott and Joey Logano at Michigan earlier this year. The trick for Larson will be to figure out how to balance between going aggressively for a win to lock himself in, and being smart and taking care of his car and consistently gaining points to get in that way. Where he stands in the points will dictate his approach, but I expect him to get to Richmond needing just to survive with a top ten finish and hope someone behind him doesn’t pull a Jeremy Mayfield and win and get in. However, his margin for error is small, he can’t afford to crash out of another race, and if he has a top five finish, he can’t afford to fade late to 15th from driving too hard trying to win the race. The speed is there at times for this team, and if Larson just takes care of things the rest of the way, he should be able to overcome the deficit he faces in the points standings.

Chances of making the chase – 43%

Ricky Stenhouse -41 Even with his top ten finish at Loudon on Sunday, the 40th place showing at Kentucky after an early crash might have been the nail in the coffin to Stenhouse’s chase hopes. As with Bayne, the improvement at Roush is very evident, but a day like that when you don’t post enough top tens and fives to make up for it is difficult to overcome this late in the game. Stenhouse has 11 finishes of 16th or better, the only problem is 8 of those are in the 12th-16th range, and that just won’t get it done when you’ve got three finishes of 25th or worse over the last five races. While he benefits if Earnhardt can’t go at Darlington, it’s still not going to be enough to give one confidence that he can run down and out perform the likes of Larson, Blaney and Kahne over the next seven races. His best hopes are to hope the pressure forces some of his competitors into some mistakes over the next few weeks to give him a window, but at this point, there are just too many teams to jump without winning a race, and despite all the improvements at Roush, this team just isn’t there yet.

Chances of making the chase – 3%

A.J. Allmendinger -43 – This pretty much all comes down to one race, and one race alone. And this one particular race will have huge ramifications across the board. Since failing to win at Sonoma, Watkins Glen has been circled by this team. Allmendinger’s year started more promising with the team showing more speed on ovals at the beginning of the year, but the season has quickly spiraled out of control and confidence and momentum appear to be shot. The only way they’re getting in is to win at Watkins Glen. And truth be told, to a man, many might tell you they like having a track they’re that good at being their one shot deal, and like the odds of pulling that off more than pointing their way in. Considering the deficit he faces, and especially factoring in the way he’s run lately, Allmendinger and everyone in this chase battle knows it’s all or nothing at Watkins Glen. The pressure on him and his team will be immense, and recently they’ve succumbed to such pressures on road courses and have not handled it well. Can they get it together at Watkins Glen? My gut has told me yes, and it’s me told me yes for a couple of weeks now. There are a lot of drivers in this battle for the final chase spots that don’t want to see Allmendinger reduce the number of available spots from five to four, but it’s very possible he does that. If you wonder why I may seem a little less than confident in Dillon and McMurray getting into the chase despite healthy points leads, it’s because I think there is a really decent chance Allmendinger goes to victory lane in the Finger Lakes region of New York and takes away one of those spots. Assuming Elliott and Newman get in, which, they absolutely should, we’d essentially be down to two spots should Allmendinger win at Watkins Glen. I almost considered doing two different chase odds for each driver, one if Allmendinger wins, and one if he doesn’t, because it’s that big a game changer. If Allmendinger doesn’t win at Watkins Glen, his chances of making the chase drop to essentially less than 1%, even if he gets a second place finish and has a nice points day.


A repeat performance of 2014 for A.J. Allmendinger could flip the race to the chase on it’s ear and create havoc over the final races of the regular season

Chances of making the chase – 25%

Greg Biffle  -51 – It’s the case of too little too late for Greg Biffle. The good news is the team has put together three top ten finishes in a row. The bad news is that 11 finishes of 18th or worse over the first 16 races dug a points hole that is more than likely going to be too difficult to climb out of. A lot can happen over seven races, and a couple bad races by some of the guys Biffle is pursuing, and potentially a longer absence by Earnhardt, Biffle could find himself still holding on to a chance as they near Darlington and Richmond. And much like Kasey Kahne and the 5 team, Biffle’s team holds a definitive advantage in experience. Do they have the speed to win a race and secure a spot that way? Likely not. And if anyone in front of them were to win a race, it would almost certainly spell the end of their quest. However, considering where this team was, that they’re even on the outskirts of the discussion is a testament to the fight and drive from both the driver and team. If Biffle can sniff the chase when they arrive to Michigan, don’t be surprised if he makes things very uncomfortable for the guys he’s chasing.

Chances of making the chase – 1.5%

Other (must win) – There really isn’t anyone here you think might be able to steal a win, but you simply never know, so we much acknowledge the possibility. One potential candidate would be Clint Bowyer perhaps getting a win at Watkins Glen or at Bristol. Aric Almirola has run better lately, but thinking a win is possible is still an extreme reach.

Chances of making the chase – 0.5%

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Dear Tim Duncan

Dear Tim Duncan,

Man, I’ve watched you play so long I remember watching you when you were arguably still the second best player on Wake Forest and you guys got knocked out in the Sweet 16 by Big Country. I think we know who got the last laugh.

Tim Duncan, few in any sport have ever done it as well, as graciously, and correctly, as you have, from college through the NBA. Yours is a career I think many took for granted.

“The Big Fundamental” was the perfect nickname. It was how you conducted yourself, and it was the manner in which you played. Substance over style, I believe it was. And I truly believe that Lebron James, Shaq, and Kobe Bryant all only reached their true heights because of the motivation to beat you. You swept both Lebron and Kobe in your first two meetings against them. They may have been the bigger star, but you showed them what it took to be a champion.

You won with The Admiral and Sean Elliott and Bruce Bowen, then won with an entirely different cast of characters with Ginobili and Parker. And while Robinson was great, it was the end of his run when you joined. Parker and Ginobili are great basketball players, but how great would they be without you down in the paint?

But all through the Spurs phenomenal run there you were. The steady rock. Your teams NEVER had worse than a .600 winning percentage. Think about that. In his entire career, not once did they fall below that mark.

In the first four NBA finals that you won, your Spurs lost a total of six games in those series. That’s called getting it done and leaving no doubt.

And you’re a Ray Allen three pointer away from being equal with Michael in terms of champions. Sometimes I think people forget that when talking about the greatest we ever saw and the best legacy.

And yet through all of that, the greatest moment of your career will be forever be you getting thrown out of a game while sitting on the bench. Of all people…. I think we all can relate to being told to be quiet, so we want to see how far we can push it so we take a little chuckle to see if a parent or teacher is going to say something. That it was Joey Crawford, you know he would. Interesting that perhaps your most memorable moment was one that reflected the antithesis of everything you were about on that basketball court.

Thank you Tim Duncan for being everything right and good about pro sports.

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