Those Bitter Philadelphians

“The only NL East team truly capable of keeping the Phils out of the postseason isn’t found in an opposing dugout but in the mirrors of their own clubhouse.” Those are the words of Bob Ford, sports writer for the Philadelphia Inquirer, and well, a very uninformed baseball man.

The Atlanta Braves are six games ahead of the Phillies simply because they are a better team. Ford does his very best to belittle the accomplishments of the Braves and to make them appear as just a mediocre team lucky to be in first place, but it is either because he’s only paid attention to the Braves when they are playing his beloved Phillies, or it’s because he’s a typical Philadelphia fan who is completely blind to the sports world outside of his wonderful city full of peace, love, and harmony.

This shouldn’t come as a surprise though. We know Philadelphia natives would much rather bash, and bemoan their own players than dare give credit to an opponent. They would much rather boo their players and coaches and trash their management officials than acknowledge that someone else just might be better.

For example, when discussing Brian McCann and Troy Glaus, Ford states that they, “have decent power numbers, but they are also easy outs.” Excuse me? He is aware that Ryan Howard makes outs at a more frequent rate than his first base counterpart Troy Glaus, correct? Perhaps not.

I guess he’s also completely unaware of the fact that Brian McCann boasts an on base percentage of .382. That’s all of one measly point behind Chase Utley, the current leader for Philadelphia among players with enough at-bats to qualify.

Furthermore on the Atlanta catcher, McCann’s production has spiked significantly as of late, and that’s not a coincidence that it has coincided with what seems to be a better solution for the vision troubles that plagued him early in the season. If Mr. Ford would actually pay attention to the teams he chooses to write about and dissect, he would have known this. Alas, this must not be the case.

Yeah, easy outs, right?

Maybe Ford has also chosen to ignore the little issue of the Braves having five players with over 200 plate appearances sitting with an OPS of over .800. Philadelphia’s apparently superior squad only has three such players.

Ford likes to cite the injuries and inconsistencies with Chipper Jones.. Okay, fair enough. However, last I checked, Chase Utley is currently hurt himself, and Jimmy Rollins spent quite a bit of time on the DL as well. So injuries to key cogs aren’t a problem for Philadelphia, just Atlanta?

In regards to Chipper Jones, Ford fails to recognize the surge in Jones’ power numbers since talk of retirement came up, as well as his still impressive .376 on base percentage. Ford’s ignorance doesn’t just end with the offense though, oh no, he’s an equal opportunity uninformed sports columnist.

While Ford does acknowledge that the Braves bullpen has been better, the credibility gained from at least admitting this is quickly lost with the next statement he makes. “The real question, though is whether, with one game to save, you would feel any more comfortable with (Billy) Wagner than you do with Brad Lidge. By the end of the season, the difference could be minuscule.”

Are you serious? One pitcher has a strikeout to walk ratio of 4.9, 13.6 strikeouts per nine innings, a WHIP of 0.821, and ERA of 1.15. The other pitcher’s line reads of a 2.75 strikeout to walk ratio, 11.9 strikeouts per nine innings, a WHIP of 1.380 and an ERA of 4.32. Yeah, obviously this is an exceptionally close call. Of course, coming from the same man who called Troy Glaus an easy out while his own first basemen has proven to be an easier out this year, this should come as no surprise.

He rightfully refers to Tim Hudson as a staff ace, but, predictably picks apart the rest of the Braves rotation.

Derek Lowe’s high ERA is cited, which is fair enough, many Braves fans themselves have had issues with Lowe, though it should be noted that over his last seven starts Lowe’s ERA has been 3.27, including starts against the Twins, White Sox, and *ahem*, the Phillies where he went at least 7 innings while allowing 2 earned runs or less. Just thought that should be pointed out.

Ford’s questioning of Medlen’s ability to hold up down the stretch is a valid concern, as it will be interesting to see what happens to the youngster with a much heavier work load being heaped on him. However, this is simply Ford’s way to discount what has been a very, very impressive first half for Medlen, and of course, no Philadelphia person ever wants to recognize the strengths of any opponent if they can help it.

It is true that Tommy Hanson does indeed have a 4.19 ERA. However, let’s not get crazy here, 4.19 is not THAT bad. After all, the Phillies team ERA is an amazingly low 4.09. Oh wait, it’s not that low after all, is it? Keep in mind that in Hanson’s last 10 outings, he’s allowed two runs or less in seven of them. Some really, really, horrendous outings have marred Hanson’s season, and there is no question the pitcher who has barely been in the big leagues for over a year needs to be more consistent. However, more often than not, he’s been a very effective starter. Again, if Mr. Ford would look at the big picture and not just one simple stat, this might become apparent.

The more interesting case though is his dismissal of Jair Jurrjens as a front line starter. His description of Jurrjens reminds us that he’s, “just back from the disabled list and carrying around a 4.75 ERA.”

Indeed, Jurrjens is fresh off the disabled list, all the more reason to further discount that abnormally high of his. Since his return, Jurrjens has pitched just like his usual, ace of the staff type self. He’s 3-0 with a 2.55 ERA and the league has an OBP of .300 in those three outings.

Once again, Ford simply looks at the ERA and uses that to discount how good Jurrjen is, and really, has been, this season. There was that nightmare of a start against San Diego in April where he was rocked for eight runs. However, aside from that dismal outing, he hasn’t given up more than three runs in any other start all season (granted, one of those was when he allowed three in the opening frame, coincidentally, the game he injured himself and went on the DL).

Mr. Ford can look at a few numbers here and there, and nothing else, and convince himself the Braves aren’t for real all he wants. He can convince himself the Phillies just have to play to their potential and they’ll return to their rightful place atop the National League East. If he were to look for the rest of the story, he’d clearly see otherwise. Not that he’d admit it though.

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1 Comment

Filed under Baseball, Braves, Sports

One response to “Those Bitter Philadelphians

  1. This could not be a more perfect rebuttal of Ford’s childish behavior. It’s like your big brother running away screaming, “I don’t want to play anymore! I quit!” It’s nothing but an attempt to water down the achievements of the opposition. This town (Philly) is full of nothing but talking heads spewing their pathetic attempts at propaganda.

    Right on bud.

    Protip: get a higher resolution top banner for your website.

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